Texting Guidelines

GENERAL 1350 KRNT-AM OFFICIAL TEXTING GUIDELINES

Here are our rules for our text messaging program and are part of our rules governing contesting and privacy.

  1. Messages sent to and from 1350 KRNT-AM are identified by the SHORTCODE, 77000.
  2. Messages may contain a sponsor message. No purchase is necessary, but standard text message rates apply.
  3. You can opt out of messaging by texting “stop” to 77000. If you opt out and then enter another text contest, you must to opt out again.
  4. You can enter contests with keywords, which will change regularly. Keywords will be announced on-air and/or on the website and/or in an email blast and/or texted to those signed up to receive texts. Eligibility requirements apply.
  5. In case of a dispute, our decisions are final. We may disqualify ineligible entrants or those who tamper with the entry process.
  6. We are not responsible for any factor affecting the availability or performance of the text messaging service.
  7. We may cancel or modify the contest or provide an alternate prize.

Please see our complete contesting rules for more information.


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