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UPDATE: Vikings’ Adrian Peterson’s 2-year-old son dies

UPDATE: Vikings’ Adrian Peterson’s 2-year-old son dies

SON PASSES: Adrian Peterson's son has succumbed to his injuries. Photo: Associated Press

The 2-year-old son of National Football League’s Most Valuable Player Adrian Peterson died on Friday after being allegedly assaulted by his mother’s boyfriend in Sioux Falls, local media in Minnesota and police in South Dakota reported.

Sioux Falls police spokesman Sam Clemens said the boy died after he suffered injuries doctors believe were caused by child abuse.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune newspaper reported on Friday that Nelson Peterson, Adrian’s father, confirmed that the star running back’s son was assaulted, allegedly by the mother’s boyfriend. The paper reported that the child and his mother live in Sioux Falls, according to Nelson Peterson.

After practice on Friday, the Minnesota Vikings running back said in videotaped remarks that he would not take questions about the incident and asked for his privacy to be respected.

Earlier on Friday in South Dakota, officials held a news conference to announce that a 27-year-old man had been charged with aggravated battery and aggravated assault on accusations of abusing a 2-year-old boy, who was not identified.

Clemens said the man, Joseph Patterson, will face additional charges.

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