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Hundreds still unaccounted for after Colo. floods

Hundreds still unaccounted for after Colo. floods

Rescue efforts continue in Colorado. Photo: Associated Press

LYONS, Colo. (AP) — As water recedes and flows east onto the Colorado plains rescuers are shifting their focus from emergency airlifts to trying to find the hundreds of people still unaccounted for after last week’s devastating flooding.

Federal and state emergency officials said more than 3,000 people have been evacuated by air and ground, but calls for those emergency rescues have decreased.

The state’s latest count has dropped to about 580 people missing, and the number continues to decrease as the stranded get in touch with families.

State officials reported six flood-related deaths, plus two women missing and presumed dead. The number was expected to increase. It could take weeks or even months to search through flooded areas looking for bodies.

State and local transportation officials are tallying the washed-out roads, collapsed bridges and twisted railroad lines.

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An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

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