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Will you ‘run for the border’ for breakfast?

Will you ‘run for the border’ for breakfast?

COMING TO A DRIVE-THRU NEAR YOU: The fast-food chain says the waffle taco, which includes scrambled eggs, sausage and a side of syrup, was the top seller during breakfast hours at the five Southern California restaurants where they were tested earlier this year. The waffle taco and other Taco Bell breakfast items launch nationwide next month. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Egg McMuffin, meet the Waffle Taco.

Taco Bell is readying for the launch of its national breakfast menu on March 27, with items such as the A.M. Crunchwrap designed to appeal to its fan base of younger men.

And the chain says breakfast will be available until 11 a.m. — a half-hour longer than McDonald’s offers its Egg McMuffins.

Taco Bell President Brian Niccol says the chain intends to be a “strong No. 2″ after McDonald’s.

McDonald’s has long been the fast-food leader in the mornings, with its popular Sausage Biscuits, Hotcakes and other items pulling in roughly 20 percent of the company’s U.S. sales.

But the chain has been facing stiffer competition in recent years, with competitors such as Starbucks and Subway rolling out breakfast sandwiches as well.

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