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Rookie astronaut Tweets his journey in space

Rookie astronaut Tweets his journey in space

LIFE IN SPACE:Reid Wiseman says he's still getting used to the concept of zero gravity. Photo: Reuters

By Irene Klotz

CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. (Reuters) – First-time astronaut Reid Wiseman arrived at the International Space Station two weeks ago, but zero gravity still surprises him.

“Laughed so hard, I cried yesterday during dinner. Tears don’t run down your cheeks in space,” wrote Wiseman, who is sharing his observations and pictures with a growing following on Twitter. “Still adjusting to zero g. Just flipped a bag upside down to dump out its contents. #doesntworkhere,” Wiseman tweeted last week.

Wiseman is one of six men living aboard the station, a $100 billion research laboratory that flies about 260 miles above Earth.

So far, the rookie astronaut has about 74,000 Twitter followers on his @astro_reid account. More than 40 current astronauts from the United States, Europe, Japan, Russia and Canada use the social media service, sharing perspectives 140 characters at a time.

Tweeting astronauts include two-time shuttle veteran and Hubble Space Telescope repairman Mike Massimino, who has 1.3 million followers, and former station commander Chris Hadfield of Canada, with nearly 1.1 million followers.

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An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

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