News

Recall Roundup: 2 infant deaths prompt baby monitor recall

Recall Roundup: 2 infant deaths prompt baby monitor recall

RECALLED: 80,000 Kia minivans are being recalled. Photo: Associated Press

A look at the latest recalls.

Kia recalls 80K minivans
Kia Motors Corp. is recalling nearly 80,000 minivans in the U.S. because a suspension part can break and cause drivers to lose control of the vehicles.

The recall affects Sedona minivans from 2006 through 2012. They were sold or registered in 20 states and Washington, D.C., where salt is used to clear roads in the winter.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the lower control arms near the wheels can rust and break due to salt exposure. Kia dealers will inspect the parts and rustproof or replace them for free starting next month.

2 infant deaths prompt baby monitor recall
Canadian-based Angelcare Monitors, Inc. is recalling 600,000 baby monitors after two infants strangled themselves in the unit’s cord and died. The monitors are sold nationwide at retailers including Toys R Us, Walmart, Target, Meijer and Sears. Parents should immediately stop using the monitors and contact the company for a replacement part.

Fire hazard prompts refrigerator recall
Viking Refrigerators are recalling side-by-side refrigerators due to an electrical connection that can fail and potentially catch fire.

For more recall and product safety information, visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Recent Headlines

in Sports

This week’s top sports shots

little

A look at the biggest stories and best photography in sports this week.

in Sports

This weekend’s sports schedule

yankees

A complete look at this weekend's sports schedule.

in National

Making headlines this week

surf

A look at the week's biggest newsmakers and the stories you won't soon forget.

in National

WATCH: The history of Labor Day

21-overlay4

While you take your three day weekend, remember those who struggled to get Friday and Saturday off.

in Lifestyle

Rice replaces ice in India bucket challenge

An Indian school boy eats a midday meal provided free at a government school in Hyderabad, India, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. India has offered free midday school meals since the 1960s in an effort to persuade poor parents to send their children to school, a program that reaches some 120 million children. The country now plans to subsidize wheat, rice and cereals for some 800 million people under a $20 billion scheme to cut malnutrition and ease poverty.

The famous "ice bucket" challenge is inspiring thousands of Indians to follow suit, but with a twist - they are replacing ice with rice to help the country's hungry people.