News

Obama, Clintons to lay wreath at JFK’s grave in 50-year remembrance

Obama, Clintons to lay wreath at JFK’s grave in 50-year remembrance

50 YEARS LATER: Flowers are left at the memorial for U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Hyannis, Massachusetts November 14. Nov. 22 will mark the 50th anniversary of his assassination in 1963. Photo: Reuters/Brian Snyder

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama will join former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Wednesday in a wreath-laying ceremony at John F. Kennedy’s grave to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his assassination.

First lady Michelle Obama will also attend the ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery on Nov. 20, two days before the anniversary of the president’s death, a senior administration official said on Saturday.

Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was killed at the age of 46 during a trip to Texas on Nov. 22, 1963. He was buried at the military cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial.

Also on Wednesday Obama will present the Presidential Medal of Freedom, established by Kennedy, to recipients at the White House.

The award is considered the nation’s highest civilian honor.

Recent Headlines

yesterday in Music, Sports

Lorde meets Hall of Famer who inspired ‘Royals’

lorde

The singer behind the hit meets the real-life Royal that inspired her song.

yesterday in Viral Videos

Kicked in the head by a train

Kicked By Train

This man tried to take a selfie while a train passed but was a little too close.

yesterday in National

Washington state mudslide death toll rises to 39

mud

The official death toll from a mudslide rose to 39, after search teams pulled out two more bodies from the mud and rubble.

yesterday in Viral Videos

Slow motion parkour dog

Parkour Dog

If you thought parkour videos were cool, wait until you see the dog version!

yesterday in Lifestyle

Americans urged to plan for the end

doctors

National Health Care Decisions Day encourages people to think about their own end-of-life preferences.