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City orders removal of ‘naughty’ Christmas tree

City orders removal of ‘naughty’ Christmas tree

G-RATED CHRISTMAS: A Christmas tree that was previously adorned with red sex toys is displayed in a street, in Milan, Italy, Friday, Dec. 13. The provocatively adorned Christmas tree was just too naughty for Milan city officials, who ordered it denuded of its racy red sex toys. Photo: Associated Press

MILAN (AP) — A provocatively adorned outdoor Christmas tree in central Milan, Italy was just too naughty for city officials, who have ordered it denuded of its racy red sex toys.

The city said in an order that the Christmas season, “qualifying as a holiday for children and families, requires sobriety in urban decorations,” in particular when using “traditional symbols that distinguish Christmas.”

Norma Rossetti, who launched an Italian sex toy e-commerce website this year, said Friday she complied immediately with the order.

She defended the so-called “Tree of Pleasure,” saying the objects chosen were elegant and not obviously X-rated. She said her goal is to break down taboos by making sex toys “completely normal everyday objects. ”

Rossetti acknowledged some complaints, but said most passers-by during the one-day display were enthusiastic.

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