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$60 ‘Snuggle House’ shuts down amid scrutiny

$60 ‘Snuggle House’ shuts down amid scrutiny

SUPER SNUGGLING: A business offering snuggles for $60 an hour has closed after only a few weeks. Photo: clipart.com

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — An attorney for a new snuggling business in Wisconsin’s capital city says the operation has shut down.

Madison’s Snuggle House offered customers cuddles with a professional snuggler for $60 an hour. The business opened Nov. 15.

A posting on the Snuggle House’s Facebook page late Friday said the business had closed. Attorney Tim Casper, who represents Snuggle House owner Matthew Hurtado, confirmed the closure to The Associated Press on Monday.

He says Hurtado was tired of scrutiny from city officials, who were concerned the business could be a brothel and the potential for sexual assaults, as well as negative publicity.

Casper says the business had several dozen clients. But he says Hurtado didn’t open the business to make money. He did it because he believes non-sexual touching can relieve stress.

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